22 Oct 2022 | 3 mins

Heartbreak High Creator Lists Tasmania’s Best House - Sydney Morning Herald

Heartbreak High Creator Lists Tasmania’s Best House - Sydney Morning Herald

If director, producer and writer Michael Jenkins is blushing from all the attention of late it is likely thanks to the reboot of his hit Australian television series Heartbreak High, currently among the most-watched shows on Netflix.

But his home in Tasmania is also set to excite lovers of fine real estate when it hits the market in coming days.

Jenkins and his partner Amanda Robson’s home, Trial Bay House, is the landmark property that scored architecture’s top gong, the Robin Boyd Award for best residential house in 2010, making it the first time a house in the state won the prestigious Australian Institute of Architects accolade.

When the couple purchased the property on its 17-hectare, waterfront site overlooking Bruny Island in 2002 it was a 1970s pitched-roof house designed by architect Ray Heffernan in need of work.

A redesign by architect James Jones resulted in a far more contemporary residence that features a concrete and glass “Channel Room”, named after its setting overlooking the D’Entrecasteaux Channel and reputedly designed to look like a film camera.

Forbes

Trial Bay House in Tasmania won the Robin Boyd Award for best residential house in 2010.

After a 20-year absence, Jenkins and Robson are returning to Sydney, listing their landmark home with a guide of $9 million to $9.9 million with Forbes Global Properties’ Tracey Atkins and Robert Fletcher.

It remains unknown where in Sydney the couple are heading next, but their former Sydney home was another award-winning property, Alster House.

The Victorian terrace was the first to eclipse the $2 million mark in Paddington when it was purchased by former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull and former Sydney Lord Mayor Lucy Turnbull in 1988, but was sold for a loss in 1995 when Jenkins and Robson bought it for $1.73 million.

True to Jenkins-Robson form, a redesign was commissioned, this time by architect Andrew Nolan that won an AIA award in 2001.